The Vickers was a water-cooled weapon and, therefore, there are many accessories that relate to this area; however, the majority remained unchanged through the service of the gun.

There was also the consideration of water itself, and the various mixtures to ensure it didn’t freeze or corrode the gun.

Water

Whilst it may seem unnecessary to write about how water was used in the Vickers machine gun, there are some trials and developments that should be covered, particularly considering the use of water in cold weather conditions and how it was preventing from freezing.

Each water-jacket contained 7.5 pints of water when full. The rate of boiling depended upon the rate of fire.

The earliest considerations to water and how it was affected by freezing conditions, which then caused too much friction on the barrel and the recoiling portions of the gun, were made during the Maxim’s service. Experiments were overseen by the Small Arms Committee and included oil as well as water initially.

124. Materials for Cleaning Arms.

*Clogging of oil used on mechanisms, &c., of Rifles, Machine Guns, &c., in cold weather.

D. of A., 14.5.1904, forwarded the following for consideration and remarks:-

OIL FOR MECHANISM OF SERVICE RIFLE AND MACHINE GUN.

Rangoon oil is supplied for oiling mechanism of rifles and Maxim guns.

On the departure of the Jackson-Harmsworth Arctic Expedition, in 1894, it was decided to supply Mr. Jackson with a Service Magazine rifle to ascertain how the mechanism worked in high latitudes. On the working of the mechanism Mr. Jackson reported as follows:-

“No oil whatsoever must be used on the striking bolt, otherwise even at comparatively high temperature such as minus 5 [degrees] F. the oil becomes very thick and clogs, and the striker fails to strike the cap with sufficient force to explode it. A little paraffin may be substituted with which it works perfectly, strongly and smoothly, even at temperatures of -35 [degrees] F.”

On this C.S.O.F., 6.12.1895, observed:- “The removal of all oil from the firing mechanism and the substitution of paraffin sparingly applied is a precaution that should be inculcated on all troops operating in places where the temperature falls below freezing point of oil.”

No special instructions appear to have been issued in consequence of above, and the question came up again in 1902 on a report of failure of the striker to fire cartridge in consequence of oil clogging it. This was in South Africa. A similar report came from Canada. This was investigated, and it was considered that paraffin would be the most suitable oil to use at low temperatures, and the following instructions were issued on the subject – para. 200 “Musketry Regulations”:-

“Rangoon oil when subject to great cold becomes thick and causes miss-fires by checking the action of the striker; in cold climates, therefore, oil, petroleum, Russian, lubricating (i.e., paraffin oil), will be substituted for Rangoon oil, and may be drawn in lieu of it in places where the temperature falls below 10 [degrees] F.”

A similar instruction was inserted in “Equipment Regulations, Armourers’ Instructions, and Maxim Gun Handbook.”

With a view of having a lubricant suitable for both hot and cold climates, trials are in progress at various stations at Home, Mediterranean, Canada, and the Cape, with oil, petroleum, Russian, lubricating, reported to bear cooling to a lower temperature than Rangoon oil without becoming unserviceable as a lubricant. Trials in mechanism of Maxim guns and rifles are in progress, and such reports as have been received show that the oil, petroleum, Russian, lubricating, is satisfactory.

The Commandant, Hythe, called attention to “The Times” report of the failure of the mechanism of the rifles and Maxim guns to work in the Tibet Expedition – the Chumbi Valley – owing to the freezing of the oil in the mechanism.

The report stated that-

“The effect of the cold upon inanimate objects has been very curious. The most important difficulty is that the Maxim guns and rifles have in some cases been almost disabled by the frost. It was at once obvious that the water-jacket of the Maxims was not merely useful, but a position source of danger. A mixture of run 25 per cent, and water 75 per cent., with sufficient kerosene added to make the mixture undrinkable, has been tried. This, however, freezes into a kind of slush, and the mixture is for the future to be altered to half-and-half rum and water. But this is by no means the only trouble. The oil in the locks of both rifles and Maxims freezes into a clogging mess which has caused endless miss-fires. This difficultly has been overcome by taking out the locks of the Maxims, cleaning them from oil as much as possible, and keeping them warm and dry by wearing them constantly in the breast pockets of the officers of the guns. The men on cold nights take their rifles into their blankets with them for the same reason, a curious sight for anyone who remembers how the men at Modder River had from an exactly opposite reason to lie upon their rifles to keep them still useful. But the difficulties are not even thus over so far as the Maxims are concerned. The normal “pull” of the fusee spring is between 7 lbs and 8 lbs. This has been found to be far too great for these altitudes. Single shots only can be fired thus. The reason has been variously given, but nothing entirely satisfactory has been yet suggested. The contention that cordite loses its force up here is disproved by the fact that the sighting remains satisfactory. Two methods of removing this difficulty have been tried. The fusee spring has in some cases been successfully weakened to 3 1/2 lbs. – or occasionally even less – when the automatic action again assets itself, but at a greater reduced rate of speed. Another ingenious remedy is the attachment to the muzzle of the gun of a small device originally intended for use when the barrel became very much fouled. This restores the action of the lock, with the fusee spring at its normal tension, thus retaining the normal rate of fire. Unfortunately, however, the part has only been supplied with a few of the Maxims at present with the force.”

The Committee recommend that trials be carried out to ascertain the best lubricant for use at low temperatures on rifle and machine gun mechanisms, and how the water in cooling chamber of Maxim machine gun can be kept in fluid condition when exposed to cold, also if this is the best thing to use under those conditions.

*The rifles could not be traced.

Minute No. 857, 16.5.1904, Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee.

Trials and reports continued.

124. Materials for Cleaning Arms.

Clogging of Oil on Mechanisms, &c., of Rifles, Machine Guns, &c., in cold weather.

Previous Minute 857, 16.5.1904.

D. of A., 20.6.1904, forwarded for consideration:-

“Chemist, W.D., was told on 28.5.1904 that oil, Russian, lubricating, was now under trial, and was asked to ascertain the temperature down to which it could be relied on, and whether at low temperatures smooth working was to be expected between metallic surfaces without lubrication; also with regard to the mixture of soft soap and water for Maxim gun jackets, whether 23 degrees F. was lowest temperature at which it could be relied on, and if there were any other simple cheap mixtures that he could recommend.”

He reported: 14.6.1904:-

“At 10 degrees F. oil, petroleum, Russian, lubricating, has the consistency of syrup, is rather thinner if anything, and remains quite clear. It does not lose its lubricating qualities , but they are such as must be expected from a relatively thick oil. No smooth working can be expected between metallic surfaces without lubrication.

“The freezing point of water can be considerably lowered by the addition of soft soap. Such a mixture would be free from the objections urged against an alcoholic liquid.

“In 1894 experiments were carried out here with such mixtures, and it was found that with a solution of 1 lb. of soft soap in 20 gallons of water the temperature could be lowered to 23 degrees F. before ice formed against the side of the vessel (glass tubes were used inserted in freezing mixture); at 22 degrees F. the contents of the tubes formed a kind of slush. The liquid in this condition would probably not interfere with the action of the Maxim.

“In this experiment the cooling was continuous down to 5 degrees F. Below 22 degrees solid ice began to form from the bottom of the tube; and at 5 degrees F. there was solid ice halfway up the tube.

“The problem of finding a cooling liquid that is efficient at all temperatures and in other respects unobjectionable is an old one and very many experiments and suggestions have been made, but without satisfactory results.”

The Committee recommend that experiments be made to ascertain if the Maxim gun can be fired with water in the jacket frozen, and also if the tensions of the springs are affected by low temperatures.

Minute No. 864, Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, 4th July 1904.

124. Materials for Cleaning Arms.

Clogging of oil in mechanism, &c. of rifles, and machine guns in cold weather.

Previous Minute 863, 4.7.1904.

EXPERIMENTS WITH MAXIM GUN IN JACKET FROZEN,

“A trial was arranged with the Secretary, Explosives Committee, and carried out.

“Two guns and one belt of ammunition were left for 48 hours in a climatic house, in which the temperature varied from 0 [degrees] to 20 [degrees] below zero.

“In one gun 20 per cent. of glycerine was mixed with the water, and when this gun was taken from the house the mixture was found to be frozen into a thick slush.

“Owing to the barrel not recoiling sufficiently this gun would only fire single shots with the frozen ammunition, until about 90 rounds had been fired when it began to work automatically, with a few stoppages, and on the weight of the fuzee spring being reduced it worked correctly, both with frozen and non-frozen ammunition.

“In the case of the gun which was filled with water only, the water had frozen into a solid mass. It was found that the front of the barrel casing had burst open, and that the barrel had from some cause become jammed towards the rear.

“The gun had to be stropped on the range and even then some difficulty was found in getting the barrel home.

“This gun fired over 100 shots singly with frozen ammunition before it commenced to work automatically, with a few stoppages, and then on lightening the fuzee spring it worked correctly, both with frozen and non-frozen ammunition.

“In one gun no alteration took place in the weight of the springs; and in the other the weights were very slightly reduced during the freezing operation.

“Both guns would undoubtedly have fired automatically sooner if the fuzee springs had been reduced in weight before commencing the trial, but this was not done in order to see how many single shots were required to free the gun.”

The Committee would like information as to the cause of the bursting of the barrel casing, particularly as to whether the regulation amount of fluid was added, or whether casing was completely filled. They would also welcome a suggestion as to how this bursting could be avoided in the future.

Minute No. 870, Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, 29th August 1904.

124. Materials for Cleaning Arms.

I. Clogging of oil on mechanisms, &c., of rifles and machine guns in cold weather.

Experiments with Maxim gun with water in jacket frozen.

Previous Minute 870, 29.8.1904.

C.I.S.A., 24.9.1904.

When the barrel casing burst it had evidently been filled quite full as the filling hole was blocked with a lump of solid ice.

A further trial has now been carried with four guns, five pints of water were put into the barrel casings of three guns, and into the 4th (No. 10358), five pints of a mixture of 10 per cent. of glycerine and water.

These guns were put into the climatic house at a temperature of 28 [degrees] Fahrenheit and left there for 144 hours, the temperature when they were taken out being 20 below zero.

Through an error only 10 per cent. of glycerine was used instead of 20 percent. The mixture was frozen quite as hard as the plain water.

No alteration in the weights of the springs took place during freezing. Gun No. 10357 was fired with the fuzee spring at 5 lbs. at which weight it fired correctly before the water was frozen. 240 single shots were fired before the gun commenced to work automatically.

Gun No. 10363 was fired with the spring at various weights from 4 to 7 lbs., and in this case also only the last 10 rounds in a belt of 250 rounds worked automatically.

Gun No. 10364 was placed in the freezing chamber with the muzzle attachment on, and the fuzee spring set at 7 1/2 lbs. This gun commenced to work automatically after 14 single shots had been fired, and the weight of the fuzee spring reduced to 6 lbs.

Gun No. 10358 had a mixture of water, and 10 per cent. of glycerine in the barrel casing; after six single shots had been fired the muzzle attachment was put on, and the gun worked automatically with the fuzee spring at 6 lbs.

In all the guns it was found impossible to move the recoiling portion by hand when they were first taken out of the freezing chamber, and in every case for the first three shots the recoiling parts had to be forced home by hand before the next shot could be fired.

He thought the experiment showed that if the barrel casing was not filled too full there was no chance of its bursting when the water froze, and also that the use of the muzzle attachment got over any jamming of the gun due to frozen water in the barrel casing after a very few rounds had been fired.

He proposed that the following amendments should be made to the handbook for .303-inch and .303-inch converted Maxim, 1903:-

Page 10, line 38, after the word “freezing” add:-

“In climates where the temperature is likely to fall much below freezing point not more than about five pints of water is to be put into the barrel casing (20 per cent. of glycerine mixed with the water will prevent its freezing so quickly); the muzzle attachment for ball firing will be placed on the gun and the fuzee spring will be set at its normal weight.

“When the gun begins to work correctly the weight of the fuzee spring may be increased as found necessary.

“Should the water in the barrel casing become frozen solid, on the gun being fired the barrel will probably not recoil far enough to work the gun, and will remain back for the first two or three rounds.

To remedy thus:-

“Turn the crank handle on to the buffer spring, then bring it back to the vertical position and force the barrel to the front, pulling the belt if necessary, then let the crank handle return to the check lever and fire the gun. This should be repeated until the barrel recoils correctly.”

The D. of A., 6.10.1904, forwarded.

The Committee consider this most satisfactory, and recommend the addition to the handbook for Maxim gun of paragraphs submitted by C.I.S.A. They would further like to be information what lubrication was used in these experiments.

Minute No. 879, Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, 10th October 1904.

124. Materials for Cleaning Arms.

I. Experiments with Maxim gun with water in jacket frozen.

C.I.S.A., 14.10.1904. The guns were wiped over inside with a lightly oiled rag. The locks were dipped into a can of oil and allowed to drain for 24 hours, then the outside of the locks were wiped quite dry, and wiped over with a lightly oiled rag. The ordinary Rangoon oil was used in both cases.

The temperature when the guns were taken out was 52 [degrees] below freezing point, i.e. minus 20 [degrees] F.

The D. of A., 17.10.1904, forwarded.

Noted.

II. Report of Lieut-Gen. Sir M.G. Gerard, K.C.B., K.C.S.I., attached to the Russian Forces in the East.

Previous Minutes 857, 16.5.1904, and 879 I., 10.10.1904.

EXTRACT OF A DESPATCH from LIEUT.-GENERAL SIR M.G. GERARD, dated 27th August 1904.

“Obviously the result of personal experience in the field may largely modify some of the information received, e.g., as to the effect of extreme cold on the working of machine guns.

“I asked Colonel Waters, as having served in the artillery more recently than I have, to collect information on the points connected with that arm, but he has just reported that exact details of the Q.F. field guns are regarded as secret and have been refused him, although as several have fallen into the hands of the Japanese, they are probably by now sufficiently well known elsewhere.

“As to the lubrication used for machine guns and rifles in Russian Service, a well-informed officers tells me that what is termed ‘Rujeney salo’ gun grease, and which he describes as ‘crude, uncleaned glycerine,’ is solely employed. It has an oily, yellowish appearance. I have not yet spoken to any officer serving with mitrailleuses, of which few are used, but am told ‘they believe’ that in great cold the water-jacket is kept empty and a few rounds would warm up the weapon sufficiently to employ water.

“No one has heard of the clogging of rifles or machine guns from extreme cold. It is impossible, however, that such weapons are ever subjected in peace time to similar conditions to those which they may have to stand on service.

“In the German and Austrian armies, on whose eastern frontiers the cold is but little inferior to that in Russia itself, their lubricating mediums are respectively called ‘Mars oel’ and ‘Waffenfelt.’ My informants are ignorant of their exact composition, but believe their basis to be petroleum or glycerine. The former was adopted after trial of several kinds and is said to be the recipe of a private firm. They also have not heard of any case of rifles or machine guns clogging from extreme cold in their service.”

The D. of A., 22.10.1904, forwarded.

Minute No. 885, Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, 31st October 1904.

Containers

Cans, Condenser, Steam

  • Cat No. LV6/MT1 37556W, List of changes A 4200, CANS, CONDENSER, STEAM – Demand as “Cans, petrol”. For Guns, machine, Vickers
  • Cat No. C1/BD 6355, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Clip, pourer
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0261, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Clip
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0262, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Screw, clip
  • Cat No. Z2/ZB 12868, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Screw, clip, Nut, B.A., B.S., square, No. 1 x 3/8
  • Cat No. C1/BD 6362, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Screw, clip, Washer

The condenser can is a standard two-gallon petrol can with a brass filler assembled over the opening of the can. The filler is designed to be inserted into the filling hole of the gun casing and is attached to the can by means of a chain and “S” hook. A clip is provided for its retention when not in use.

The cap of the can is secured against loss by a shackle consisting of a wire stirrup engaging the existing wire holds in the cap to which is attached a split pin and washer to form a swivel, and a length of brass chain, one end of which connects with the swivel and the other end to the “S” hook of the filler which is attached to an eye on the can below the cap.


Fillers, M.G., Mk. I

  • Cat No. C1/BD 0260, List of changes A 3312, FILLERS, M.G., MK. 1 – With brass swivel ring with M.G. chain and 1 M.G. and 1 special “S” hook. For petrol can condenser of Gun, machine, Vickers, .303-in., Mk. 1
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0261, List of changes A 3312, FILLERS, M.G., MK. 1, Clips
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0262, List of changes A 3312, FILLERS, M.G., MK. 1, Screws, clip – With nut and 2 washers
  • Cat No. C1/CA 0867, List of changes C 3928, POURERS, WATER CAN, MK. 1 – With chain and washer; for 2-gallon water can when used with Guns, machine, Vickers, .303-in., Mk. 1
  • Cat No. J2/JA 6543, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Pourer
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0195, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Pourer, Chain, 11 links
  • Cat No. C1/BD 2027, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Pourer, Hook, “S” M.G.
  • CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Pourer, Hook, “S” special
  • Cat No. C1/BD 6360, CAN, WATER, 2 GALLON, Pourer, Ring, swivel
  • Cat No. C1/BD 2577, List of changes A 3312, SHACKLES, CONDENSER, STEAM, MK. I – Consisting of wire stirrup; swivel; and 4-in. length of brass M.G. chain; for securing cap of can, condenser, steam for Vickers .303-in. M.G., Mk. I

Bags

Bags, Water

  • Cat No. C2/BG 0005, List of Changes A7766, BAGS, WATER, M.G., MK. I, Rubber; with canvas cover; brass nozzle with plug, M.G. chain and 2 M.G. “S” hooks; and rubber washers large and small.
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0006, List of Changes A7766, BAGS, WATER, M.G., MK. I, Nozzles, With plug and large rubber washer
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0007, List of Changes A7766, BAGS, WATER, M.G., MK. I, Plugs, with M.G. chain and 2 M.G. “S” hooks, and small rubber washer
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0008, List of Changes A7766, BAGS, WATER, M.G., MK. I, Washers, rubber, large
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0009, List of Changes A7766, BAGS, WATER, M.G., MK. I, Washers, rubber, small
    This bag is supplied for use in filling the barrel casings of Vickers M.Gs. in A.F.Vs. It consists of a rubber bag enclosed in a canvas cover having, at the top, a canvas flap with a large brass eyelet. A right-angled brass nozzle, with a screwed plug secured to it by a length of M.G. chain and 2 M.G. “S” hooks, is screwed into the mouth of the bag. The capacity of the bag is approximately 6 pints.

Bags, Condenser, Steam

  • Cat No. C1/BD 0027, List of changes A 3312, BAGS, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., MK. 1 – With carrying and closing straps

Bag, Nose, Mk. IV

CollectionInsurance295

Tubing

Protector

  • Cat No. C1/BD 0880, List of changes A3312, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. I, Protectors, condenser boss – With chain and swivel

Adapters

These were used to connect the Mk I ‘B’ and later models of the condenser tubing.

  • Cat No. C1/BD 0005, List of changes A7791 and C 2022, ADAPTERS, CONDENSER, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., MK. 1 – For fixing to condenser boss on Mk. 1 gun; for use with Tubings, condenser, steam, Vickers .303-in. M.G., Mks. 1B and 3

Tubings, Condenser, Steam

There were various patterns of tubing used with the Vickers; the most commonly encountered being the Mk I “B” and Mk III.

Tubing, condenser, steam, Vickers .303-in. M.G., Mk. I

CollectionInsurance327

Tubing, condenser, steam, Vickers .303-in. M.G., Mk. I “B”

Now obsolescent, consists of a 6-ft. length of flexible metallic tubing, to one end of which is soldered a brass elbow joint with a quick-release cap and spring for connection to the adaptor on the condenser boss of the gun. The adaptor is permanently fitted and when the quick-release cap is connected the elbow joint is pressed, by the spring in the cap, into engagement with the steam outlet in the gun.

Tubing, condenser, steam, Vickers, .303-in. M.G., Mk. II.

Patterns “A”, “B” and “C” differ only in the length of the rubber hose, being 13-in., 24-in., and 16-in., respectively. The rubber hose (steam quality) is fitted with a Mk. II quick-release brass elbow joint, winged union nut and ferrule. The elbow joint has a notched spigot for attachment of the rubber hose and spring-operated catch which engages a groove in the underside of the gun condenser boss. Attached to the opposite end, by a notched spigot, is the brass ferule having a flange encircling the coned head which retains the union nut to the tubing. The brass union nut assembles to a roof fitting in the A.F.V.

Tubing, condenser, steam, Vickers .303-in. M.G., Mk. III.

Differs from the Mk. I “B” pattern only in that the flexible tubing is replaced with steam quality rubber hose, being connected to the elbow joint by means of a notched brass spigot fixed in the socket originally provided for the reception of the flexible tubing. The rubber hose is secured by copper wire binding.

The assembly of the [Mk. I ‘B’ and Mk. III] above-mentioned patterns of tubing to the gun is carried out as follows.

Apply the projections of the quick-release cap into the grooves of the adaptor, pressing the cap inward, until the projections are free to rotate around the inner shoulder of the adaptor collar, when, by reaction of the spring, they will automatically engage the locking recesses in the collar, located at 90 degrees to the grooves. Insert the free length of the tubing into the steam condenser can (see cans, condenser, steam) which should be about two-thirds full of water.

Note.- In order to avoid injury, the tubing should be disconnected from the gun when not required for use and, when possible, during transit.

  • Cat No. C1/BD 2671, List of changes A 7133, TUBINGS, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., Mk. 1B – 3/8-in. x 6-ft.; with Joint, elbow, quick-release, Mk. 1 with cap and spring
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0980, List of changes A 7771, TUBING, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS, .303-IN. M.G., MK. II, “A” – With Mk. II quick-release brass elbow joint with plunger and spring; and ferrule with union joint. With rubber hose 13-in. in length
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0981, List of changes B 174, TUBING, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS, .303-IN. M.G., MK. II, “B” – With Mk. II quick-release brass elbow joint with plunger and spring; and ferrule with union joint. With rubber hose 24-in. in length
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0982, List of changes B 174, TUBING, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS, .303-IN. M.G., MK. II, “C” – With Mk. II quick-release brass elbow joint with plunger and spring; and ferrule with union joint. With rubber hose 16-in. in length
  • Cat No. C1/BD 2672, TUBINGS, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., Mk. 3
  • Cat No. C1/BD 2673, TUBINGS, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., Mk. 3, Hose, rubber, 4-ply – 3/8-in. x 6-ft.
  • Cat No. C1/BD 2674, TUBINGS, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., Mk. 3, Joints, elbow, quick-release, Mk. 3
  • Cat No. C1/BD 2675, TUBINGS, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., Mk. 3, Spigots
  • Cat No. G2/GB 11186, TUBINGS, CONDENSER, STEAM, VICKERS .303-IN. M.G., Mk. 3, Wire, copper – Demand as “Wire, copper, soft, No. 18 S.W.G.”


Cooling-related gun components

AFV cooling parts

  • Cat No. C2/BG 0183, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. VII, Brackets, union, outlet, Mk. II
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0186, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. VII, Gaskets, bracket, outlet union
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0187, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. VII, Nuts, bracket, outlet union
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0211, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., Caps, Union – With disc. For Mks. VI* and VII guns
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0565, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .5-IN., Balls, steam valve – For Mks. IV and V guns
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0816, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .5-IN., Spring, Steam valve – For Mks. IV and V guns
  • Cat No. MT1/33824, List of changes B 3664, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., Discs, Cap, union – For Mks. VI* and VII guns. To be demanded as “Washers, fibre, round, ½-in. x 51/64-in. O.D. x 1/16-in. thick”

Steam tubes

  • Cat No. C1/BD 0908, List of changes A7792, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. I, Screws, Keeper, Steam tube, Mk. I – Also for Guns, machine, Vickers, .5-in., Mk. I (N.I.V.) and II (Section C2)
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0908, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .5-IN., Screws, Keeper, steam tube, Mk. I – For Mks. I (N.I.V.) and II guns. To be demanded under “Guns, machine, Vickers, .303-in., Mk. I”
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0985, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. I, Tubes, Steam, No. 1 – Complete, also for GUns, machine, Vickers, .5-in., Mks. I (N.I.V.) and II (Section C2)
  • Cat No. C1/BD 0985, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .5-IN., Tubes, Steam, No. 1 – For Mks. I (N.I.V.) and II guns – To be demanded under “Guns, machine, Vickers, 303-in., Mk. I”
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0162, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. IV A, Tubes, Steam, No. 2 – Complete; with plain head
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0177, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. VI*, Tubes, Steam, No. 4
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0188, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., MK. VII, Tubes, Steam, No. 5
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0324, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., Screws, Keeper, Steam, Tube, Mk. I* – For Mks. IV B, VI, VI* and VII guns
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0401, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .303-IN., Tubes, Steam, No. 3 – Complete, with head recessed for keeper screw. For Mks. IV B and VI guns
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0471, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .5-IN., MK. IV, Screws, Keeper, Steam tube, Mk. II
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0543, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERS, .5-IN., MK. V, Screws, Keeper, Steam tube, Mk. III
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0826, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERs, .5-IN., Tubes, Steam, No. 2 – With valve assembled. For Mks. IV and V guns
  • Cat No. C2/BG 0834, GUNS, MACHINE, VICKERs, .5-IN., Valves, steam tube – For Mks. IV and V guns

Sources

  • Small Arms Committee (1904) ‘124. Materials for Cleaning Arms’ in Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, Minute No. 857, 16th May 1904.
  • Small Arms Committee (1904) ‘124. Materials for Cleaning Arms’ in Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, Minute No. 863, 4th July 1904.
  • Small Arms Committee (1904) ‘124. Materials for Cleaning Arms’ in Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, Minute No. 870, 29th August 1904.
  • Small Arms Committee (1904) ‘124. Materials for Cleaning Arms’ in Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, Minute No. 879, 10th October 1904.
  • Small Arms Committee (1904) ‘124. Materials for Cleaning Arms’ in Proceedings of the Small Arms Committee, Minute No. 885, 31st October 1904.
  • War Office, 1940a; 1942; 1944c; 1949a Specific source references can be provided if required.